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The Rise and Fall of 38 Studios and the 75 Million Dollar Mystery (Part 1)

Posted under Featured, and News by Justin Oung on Thursday, September 27th, 2012 -

Curt Schilling seems like a good person who has only wanted to do great things, and that counts for a lot.  He created over 400 jobs at 38 Studios before its closure while raising huge amounts of money to finance his project through incredibly creative means.  In creating the Kingdoms of Amalur series and 38 Studios, his heart may sometimes outweigh his insight, but his passion and drive have both produced one of the most ambitious projects seen in the industry.

Former Red Sox Pitcher and 38 Studios owner Curt Schilling

That being said, 38 Studios’ massive, open-world sandbox Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning was an amazing title whose developers’ ambitions were far outmatched by its company’s financial sustainability.  Regardless of what mistakes have been made in the process of creating a dream project, it is still somewhat irresponsible in respect to those that financed the final product, those that helped to create the product, and those tax payers who are now forced to pay for the product, to take inordinate amounts of money in the hope of recouping costs in the long run.

Not only did former baseball player Curt Schilling do just that in creating a great action RPG that saw huge talents in art design, game mechanics, and storytelling, but the initial financial oversight has subsequently cost Rhode Island tax payers an estimated $112.6 million, as well as the jobs of many of his former employees.  However,  he did sink $50 million of his own money into the company by the end of May of this year, but it was still not enough to keep the game studio from going bankrupt.  It can be seen as a morale tale akin to that of the angel Icarus flying too close to the sun, but that would only simplify the problems created by the end result of one man’s courage and ambition, and the allegedly crooked politicians who used tax-payer money to finance those jobs in the state of Rhode Island.

 

| Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four |

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